Business: Nunavik seaweed special ingredient in new beauty products

Nunatsiaq News – If you want to have beautiful skin, new skin care products made with a Nunavik seaweed extract could be just the answer. The Ungava line of products are the “first natural and organic Inuit skin care line designed to act effectively, improving the appearance of the skin,” says the website for Nunavik Biosciences … The products for sale include creams and cleansers, which have a light, fragrance similar to white tea. The creams and cleansers contain no chemical compounds, dyes or perfumes and no animal ingredients, nor are they tested on animals. They’re “specially formulated, with a combination of essential fatty acids and trace elements, to protect the skin against environmental stress, to moisturize and to prevent the formation of new wrinkles,” reads the promotional information on the website. The products are packaged in recyclable, white plastic containers with the word “Ungava” stylized to resemble syllabics— but this packaging is slated to be changed, said Marc Allard, Makivik’s research and fisheries advisor.

Visit Nunavik Biosciences Website for more …

Link to source

Rapid Changes in the Arctic: Arctic Biodiversity Trends 2010 Report

Arctic Biodiversity Trends 2010 – In 2006, the Arctic Council initiated the Arctic Biodiversity Assessment ABA project. The Arctic Council Working Group on Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF) is coordinating the project and its first deliverable – the Arctic Biodiversity Trends 2010 report – presents a preliminary assessment of status and trends in Arctic biodiversity. The Arctic Biodiversity Trends 2010 report is the Arctic Council’s contribution to the United Nations International Year of Biodiversity and, at the same time, is a contribution to the Convention on Biological Diversity’s Global Biodiversity Outlook that measures progress towards 2010 Biodiversity targets.

Download Full Report: “Arctic Biodiversity Trends 2010” (PDF).  Also includes sections on key findings, indicators at a glance, presentation on the report, and introduction.

Link to source

More information:

For Susie Malgokak, Inuit prints are portals to the past

Toronto Star - To create her stencil prints, Susie Malgokak, 54, draws on memories of the childhood she lost when she was forced at age 7 to leave her family on Minto Island for an Anglican residential school. Video by Paul Watson.

Link to source

Public Input: National Energy Board Invites Participation in the Review of Arctic Offshore Drilling Requirements in Canada

Press Release – The National Energy Board (NEB) is inviting participation in its public review of Arctic offshore drilling requirements. The NEB, which has regulatory oversight for offshore drilling in the Canadian Arctic, announced on 11 May that it would be looking into Arctic safety and environmental offshore drilling requirements. The NEB expects to complete this review before receiving applications for drilling in the Arctic offshore. A preliminary scope of the review is available on the NEB website. The preliminary scope includes topics such as drilling safely while protecting the environment, responding effectively when things go wrong, and lessons learned from major accidents elsewhere.

Deadline for registration and comments (preliminary scope of the review): July 16, 2010. You can register on-line, or mail contact information to the following:

Anne-Marie Erickson, Secretary of the Board
National Energy Board
444 Seventh Avenue SW
Calgary, Alberta T2P 0X8
Fax: 403-292-5503 or (toll free): 1-877-288-8803
File Number: OF-EP-Gen-EPGen-AODR 01

Link to source

More information:

Books on the Indian Wars (by Philbrick and Gwynne)

New York Times – Born the son of an Indian warrior and his white wife (who had been captured at the age of 9 during a raid on a Texas ranch), Parker grew up to become the last and greatest chief of the Comanche, the tribe that ruled the Great Plains for most of the 19th century. That’s his one-sentence biography. The deeper, richer story that unfolds in “Empire of the Summer Moon” is nothing short of a revelation. Gwynne, a former editor at Time and Texas Monthly, doesn’t merely retell the story of Parker’s life. He pulls his readers through an American frontier roiling with extreme violence, political intrigue, bravery, anguish, corruption, love, knives, rifles and arrows. Lots and lots of arrows. This book will leave dust and blood on your jeans.

Link to source

Birchbark Canoe Raffle, Penobscot Marine Museum (July 01, 2010)

Penobscot Marine Museum – One lucky individual will soon have the rare experience of paddling his own birchbark canoe, just like the ones built by Penobscot Indians in the 17th and 18th centuries. The Penobscot Marine Museum has announced that it will raffle the canoe to raise funds for a popular public demonstration, and the drawing will be held July 1, 2010 — in good time for the canoeing season. “This is an extraordinary chance to own a piece of Maine history and American heritage,” said Niles Parker, executive director of the museum. At 16 feet overall, the canoe is authentic down to the last detail. Real birchbark is lashed to white cedar gunwales with split spruce root, and seams are sealed with a mixture of pine sap and fat. No nails or other metal were used anywhere in its construction.

Drawing: July 01, 2010. $100/ticket.

Link to source

More information:

Scientists allowed to seismic test for oil in Arctic area slated for protection

The Canadian Press (Bob Weber) – A northern regulator has given its go-ahead for government scientists to look for oil and gas in a proposed Arctic marine conservation area. But the Nunavut Impact Review Board has scolded the federal government for sending mixed messages about the wildlife-rich Lancaster Sound area. And environmentalists and Inuit leaders want Ottawa to immediately declare it has no intention of developing any potential energy resources the Geological Survey of Canada exploration turns up. “If we dont hear that kind of statement from the federal government, we could conclude that the concerns expressed by the Inuit communities are quite legitimate,” said Chris Debicki of Oceans North, speaking from Iqaluit. Last December, Environment Minister Jim Prentice signed a deal that was the first step toward creating Canadas fourth marine conservation area in Lancaster Sound off the north coast of Baffin Island. The designation has been long sought by Parks Canada, environmental groups and local Inuit.

Link to source

More information:

New report shows Alberta not doing enough to protect and recover threatened grizzly bears

CPAWS – A new report analyzing current recovery efforts in Alberta indicates that the provincial government is not doing enough to protect one of the most threatened grizzly bear populations in North America. Recent research indicates that the grizzly bear population in Alberta is small and may be declining due to expanding networks of industrial access roads and the high levels of human-caused mortality that accompany them. “Grizzly bear range once extended to Manitoba, but has been pushed westward by habitat loss and poor land use management practices” says Wendy Francis, Conservation Director for the Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative, “Alberta has an obligation to prevent grizzly bear range from being pushed even farther west by protecting grizzly habitat and reducing road densities.” At the same time, the government is not adequately implementing the recovery plan it adopted in 2008. The government’s own status report indicates the recovery area has been significantly reduced in size, and strategies limiting road densities in the recovery plan are not being followed.

Download copy of report: “A Grizzly Challenge: Ensuring a Future for Alberta’s Threatened Grizzlies” (PDF).

Link to source

More information:

Migrating Thousands of Miles With Nary a Stop

New York Times – As more birds prove to be ultramarathoners, biologists are turning their attention to how they manage such spectacular feats of endurance. Consider what might be the ultimate test of human endurance in sports, the Tour de France: Every day, bicyclists pedal up and down mountains for hours. In the process, they raise their metabolism to about five times their resting rate. The bar-tailed godwit, by contrast, elevates its metabolic rate between 8 and 10 times. And instead of ending each day with a big dinner and a good night’s rest, the birds fly through the night, slowly starving themselves as they travel 40 miles an hour. “I’m in awe of the fact that birds like godwits can fly like this,” said Theunis Piersma, a biologist at the University of Groningen.

Link to source

More information:

    Big compromise reached on Canada’s Boreal by environmental groups and forestry industry

    Mongabay.com – In what is being heralded as the ‘world’s largest conservation agreement’ 20 Canadian forestry companies and nine environmental organizations have announced an agreement covering 72 million hectares of the Canadian boreal forest (an area bigger than France). Reaching a major compromise, the agreement essentially ends a long battle between several environmental groups and the companies signing on, all members of the Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC). The companies will suspend any new logging in 29 million hectares of forest—about the size of Montana and approximately 40 percent of the land agreement—that is considered prime habitat for caribou. The logging suspension will last for three years during what is being called a ‘planning period.’ The woodland caribou are seen as a flagship species that, if protected, will aid other threatened species.

    Link to source

    More information:

    June 2022
    M T W T F S S
    « Dec    
     12345
    6789101112
    13141516171819
    20212223242526
    27282930