Report: Nilliajut – Inuit Perspectives on Security, Patriotism and Sovereignty (2013)

Inuit Knowledge Center – Articulating Inuit-specific perspectives on security, patriotism and sovereignty supports and contributes to our intent to broaden the current understanding and discourse for consideration in policy development from the community to the international levels.

Throughout these pages you will find the voices and views of 13 authors, ranging from personal narratives to academic research papers, and available in both English and Inuktitut. It was important for us to allow each author the freedom to determine their own writing style and area of focus so that we may demonstrate the breadth of Inuit knowledge on the subject at hand.

Download full report: “Nilliajut: Inuit Perspectives on Security, Patriotism and Sovereignty” (PDF).

Link to source

Linguist Lenore Grenoble helps rescue Arctic languages from extinction

The University of Chicago Magazine – Since the Soviet Union’s breakup, Grenoble has traveled to remote Siberian corners to document an endangered language called Evenki. Ethnic Evenkis constitute a Russian and Chinese minority of 35,000 nomadic hunters and reindeer herders, but only 5,000 of them use their eponymous language, and almost all mix it with Russian. Evenki speakers, Grenoble says, live in small villages of fewer than 200 residents.

Link to source

More information:

Arctic Predators, Caught in the Act (Conservation Photography)

The New York Times: To study nest predation, scientists first have to find the nests on the tundra, which is not easy … the conservation society’s scientists are relying more and more on an enormously helpful tool: camera traps. Such devices, which are motion-sensitive, collect pictures of animals as they pass in front of a camera’s lens. That means that scientists don’t even have to be present to record a predation event. Witnessing such an event in person is quite rare; predators can find a nest, consume its contents and leave in a minute’s time. With the remote cameras, we can easily identify the predator species that are doing the most damage to the nests.

Link to source

Nature Conservancy: Follow the Thelon Expedition

Cool Green Science: The Nature Conservancy’s lead scientist Sanjayan and Canada program director Dr. Richard Jeo are on an expedition through one of Canada’s most pristine areas with young members of the Dene First Nation. They will canoe along the Thelon River ending in North America’s largest and most remote wildlife refuge, the Thelon Game Sanctuary. The region is facing potentially devastating resource extraction threats and the youth attending the trip will be responsible for many important decisions in the future.

Follow their journey (Jim Lake to Hornby Point)

The Nature Conservancy’s Canada Program

Uranium mining rejected at Iqaluit public forum

CBC – Many Nunavummiut who attended a uranium forum Thursday night said they do not want uranium mining in Nunavut, while some even attacked the territorys Inuit group for supporting uranium development. More than 120 people in Iqaluit came out to the public forum, which was organized by the Nunavut government as it works on developing its own policy on uranium mining in the territory.  After hearing from officials representing government, the mining industry and the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, most of those who came up to the microphone made it clear that they want nothing to do with uranium mining … The threat of a nuclear disaster in Japan, which was rocked by a devastating earthquake and tsunami last week, weighed heavily on the minds of many audience members.

Link to source

More information:

Nunavut Tunngavik to take second look at uranium mining

Nunatsiaq News – Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. says the territory needs to see “Arctic-specific regulations” around the mining of uranium before they can throw their support behind a proposed uranium mine near Baker Lake. NTI president Cathy Towtongie said the organization will review its own uranium policy at an upcoming meeting before launching territory-wide consultations on the issue. “We need to take a balanced approach to make sure we do this right,” Towtongie told Nunatsiaq News. “We don’t have the infrastructure at this point.” The mine’s first port of emergency would be located in Newfoundland, she pointed out. NTI’s remarks are a departure from their previous backing of Areva Resources Canada Inc.‘s Kiggavik proposal, which would build an underground and open-pit mine about 75 kilometres west of Baker Lake.

Link to source

More information:

Northern Photos and Documents Aplenty at Canadiana Discovery Portal

Canadian Library Association Digest – The Canadiana Discovery Portal is rapidly becoming the best single source for Canada’s documentary heritage for researchers, students, and the general public. In October 2010, the Canadiana Discovery Portal [currently in Beta mode] surpassed the 60 million-page mark, providing Canadians with access to more than 880,000 items, including over 300,000 digitized books, along with a huge assortment of other types of historical artifacts from across the country.

The Canadiana Discovery Portal is a free service that enables users to search across the valuable and diverse digital collections of Canada’s libraries, museums and archives. It provides Canadians with access to a wealth of digital material such as books, journals, newspapers, government documents, photographs, maps, post cards, sheet music, audio and video files about our nation’s heritage. Whether you are looking for information about your own family genealogy or researching a specific topic in the history of Canada, the Canadiana Discovery Portal is an essential tool for your research.

Link to source

More information:

Book Review: “The Magnetic North – Notes from the Arctic Circle” (by Sara Wheeler)

Daily Telegraph (UK) – Sara Wheeler’s sympathies have always been with the south. The author of Cherry, a Life of the explorer Apsley Cherry-Garrard and the bestselling Terra Incognita was unashamedly biased in favour of the glorious wastes of Antarctica, and against the “complicated” Arctic. She liked the white wilderness of the area around the South Pole; the north she found worrying. After all, it’s not just chill and wildlife in the Arctic Circle; there is mess, politics and people.

Her concern was justified. To write The Magnetic North Wheeler spent two years travelling around the five countries that poke up beyond the 66 degree line. Canada, the United States, Denmark, Norway and Russia all have their own vast, Arctic territories. And in those vast, Arctic territories lurk some very big personalities. Sarah Palin is in her Alaskan kitchen, looking with narrowed eyes at the Russians across the ice. Roman Abramovich, attracted by the tax laws, registers his companies in Russian Chukotka (and all the grateful Chukchi support Chelsea). Oleg Deripaska – a long way from yachts and cobalt seas – is a big noise in the Norilsk nickel industry.

Link to source

More information:

Are the dumped nuclear reactors leaking?

Barents Observer – A total of 16 naval reactors were dumped east of Novaya Zemlya during the Soviet period. Reactors were dumped because accidents with them caused high levels of radiation. Naval yards in Severodvinsk and along the coast of the Kola Peninsula wouldn’t dare to keep them stored near populated areas, nor less to decommission them in a proper way. The “easy” solution was simply to dump them in remote Arctic waters. Most scaring are the six reactors that were dumped with their highly radioactive spent nuclear fuel still onboard. In the early 90ties, several expeditions with Norwegian and Russian radiation experts onboard sailed to the dump-sites in the Kara Sea. Their findings were just partly without worries. Some samples indicated small leakages in the near vicinity of the reactors, while some reactors were not found.

Link to source

PBS Tells the Story of Adolphus Greely and Lady Franklin Expedition (Watch On-Line)

The American Experience - In 1881, 25 men led by Adolphus Greely set sail from Newfoundland to Lady Franklin Bay in the high Arctic, where they planned to collect a wealth of scientific data from a vast area of the world’s surface that had been described as a “sheer blank.” Three years later, only six survivors returned, with a daunting story of shipwreck, starvation, mutiny and cannibalism. The film reveals how poor planning, personality clashes, questionable decisions and pure bad luck conspired to turn a noble scientific mission into a human tragedy.

Link to source

More information:

back to menu

    Northern Waterways (recent)

back to menu

    Last 9 Months

back to menu

back to menu