Topic - ‘Publications’

Rush for iron spurred Inuit ancestors to sprint across Arctic, book contends

Vancouver Sun - One of Canada's top archeologists argues in a new book that the prehistoric ancestors of this country's 55,000 Inuit probably migrated rapidly from Alaska clear across the Canadian North in just a few years — not gradually over centuries as traditionally assumed — after they learned about ...

Illustrated Children’s Book: “Apun: the Arctic Snow”

Alaska Science Forum - Born in Florida and raised in New Mexico, Matthew Sturm somehow became an expert on snow. During the past 30 years, he has traveled thousands of miles on the substance, counted how many grains it takes to cover a football field to a depth of two ...

Books: “The Whale: In Search of the Giants of the Sea” (by Philip Hoare)

All Things Considered (NPR) - As a child, Philip Hoare was always scared of water. But he was always fascinated, too — specifically by the creatures dubbed the "leviathans of the deep." So how did this frightened boy who didn't learn to swim until age 25 end up snorkeling with ...

Books: “The Industrial Transformation of Subarctic Canada” (by Liza Piper)

NiCHE - Between 1920 and 1960, Canada's northwest subarctic region experienced late-stage rapid industrialization along its large lakes. These included Lake Winnipeg, Lake Athabasca, Great Slave Lake, and Great Bear Lake. Powered by high-energy fossil fuels, the natural resources of the northwest were integrated into international commodity markets and distributed ...

MacMillan’s Book about Peary’s 1908-09 North Pole Expedition Re-issued

Bowdoin Campus News - In 1934, on the 25th anniversary of Robert E. Peary's 1908-09 North Pole Expedition, Donald B. MacMillan published How Peary Reached the Pole, which was his account of that historic expedition. Now, to mark the 100th anniversary the expedition, The Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum and Arctic Studies ...

Review: “Who Owns the Arctic” (by Michael Byers)

The Globe and Mail - “The strongest element in Canada's [sovereignty] claim,” Byers writes, “is the historical occupation by the Inuit, who have hunted, fished, travelled and lived on the Northwest Passage for millennia.” Together, the Inuit constitute “a powerful manifestation” of Canada's legal position. Byers has found that, when ...

Reviews: “Rewilding the World” (by Caroline Fraser)

New York Times - One better-known example of a rewilding project is the so-called Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative, or Y2Y. It proposes to provide corridors between those two areas in the United States and Canada, allowing wolves and other animals to travel freely between them. “Rewilding the World” examines ...

Agroforestry and Sustainability: Permaculture on a Canadian Farm

Treehugger - Based in Ontario, Canada, Ian Hamilton is operating a diverse farm that includes veggie gardens, livestock and poultry. He seems to know his stuff when it comes to permaculture principles, and interesting plants you can grow in a temperate climate. I was just disappointed to get to the ...

Books: “A Long Trek Home: 4,000 Miles by Boot, Raft, and Ski” (Erin McKittrick)

New York Times - Their last monumental trip took an entire year, during which they covered more than 4,000 miles of both urban and untouched terrain in Alaska, Washington and Canada by foot, raft and ski. Ms. McKittrick’s account of the adventure, “A Long Trek Home,” was published in October. Though ...

Author Expresses Love for Brooks Range (Bill Sherwonit)

Alaska Public Radio Network (APRN) - Anchorage Author Bill Sherwonit fell in love with the Brooks Range when he first visited the area as a geologist in the early 1970’s. He explores the place and his appreciation for it in his new book, “Changing Paths: Travels and Mediations in Alaska’s ...